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Physical Attraction


Maybe you've seen a thousand science documentaries and you're tired of hearing about the same subjects; or maybe you don't know the first thing about physics, but would love to learn. My aim with this show is to explore the vast range of topics in physics, from quantum mechanics and relativity to the physics of stars, galaxies and black holes. We will explore brand-new topics in science and technology as I learn about them. Whether you know the story already or are learning it all for the first time, my aim is to "educate, inform, and entertain!" 

We are a physics podcast. But not just a physics podcast - interviews with scientists, scholars, authors and reflections on the history and future of science and technology are all in the wheelhouse.

You can read about us here, contact us here and if you like what we do and want to help us keep doing it, you can donate here. You can subscribe to the Physical Attraction: Extra! Feed over at Patreon: www.patreon.com/PhysicalAttraction - where for $2 per bonus episode, you can help to support the show, and get some juicy bonus content too. If you donate $2+ via the Paypal link, I can also send you a direct download link to a bonus episode of your choice. Just leave your email, and the episode you want. Bonus episodes released so far: Alien Attack, Part II (45m), Failed TEOTWAWKI Predictions, Part II (1hr). 

We have a sister podcast, Autocracy Now, which deals with the lives of famous historical dictators. (Why host one podcast when you can host two?) You can find some of their episodes on our feed, or the show itself at www.autocracynow.libsyn.com 

Oct 4, 2017

As you may already know, yesterday, the Nobel Prize in Physics, 2017 was announced: it went to Kip Thorne, Barry Barish, and Rainer Weiss for their contributions towards the LIGO collaboration that detected gravitational waves.

In this special episode, I'll talk a little bit about the history of the Nobel prizes, explain what they were looking for at LIGO, how they found it, and what it means. So if you ever wondered what a gravitational wave was but were too afraid to ask, hopefully, it'll help you out.

Stay tuned at the end for a marathon housekeeping session where I once again appeal for listener questions.